CROSS CURRENTS–LAW and MORE THREE JUDGES AND THEIR TIMES–COLONIAL EDUCATION NATIONALIST CONSCIOUSNESS at Meripustak

CROSS CURRENTS–LAW and MORE THREE JUDGES AND THEIR TIMES–COLONIAL EDUCATION NATIONALIST CONSCIOUSNESS

Books from same Author: LexisNexis

Books from same Publisher: Lexis Nexis

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General Information  
Author(s)LexisNexis
PublisherLexis Nexis
ISBN9788180389795
BindingSoft Cover
LanguageEnglish
Publish YearJanuary 2013

Description

Lexis Nexis CROSS CURRENTS–LAW and MORE THREE JUDGES AND THEIR TIMES–COLONIAL EDUCATION NATIONALIST CONSCIOUSNESS by LexisNexis

This book offers a fascinating account of one of the foundational periods in Indian legal history and of the lives of three truly remarkable judges. All three, Justice Kashinath Trimbak Telang, Justice Mahadev Govind Ranade and Justice Narayan Ganesh Chandavarkar, were outstanding judges of the Bombay High Court in the 19th and early 20th centuries. They functioned in a complex, and at times hostile environment. They cooperated with the authorities and dissented as their consciences dictated. This was the period when British power was at its zenith in India. It was also the time when liberalism emerged as a political philosophy in England and continental Europe and influenced Indians who were getting educated in English and coming to terms with the country’s loss of freedom. This book, an elegant translation from the original Marathi version, presents a vivid account of the close connection between the judicial function and political activity in the period when the three judges lived and worked. It shows how sophisticated and cultured Indians subverted the Macaulean vision of the educated Indian who was supposed to be, ‘Indian in blood and colour, but English in taste, in opinions, in morals, and in intellect’. The author narrates how Telang, Ranade, and Chandavarkar grappled with issues of justice, the interpretation of traditional and colonial law, and good governance. Strikingly relevant for our own times, this book provides a glimpse of how the three helped to evolve genuine and informed public debate in India. Most importantly perhaps the book makes us realize the importance of high personal standards in public life. Readership: All those interested in the development of the Indian legal system including scholars and students of Political Science, Modern Indian History, lawyers and members of the judiciary.